Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

 images.jpegThe dilapidated buildings stand against the rain.  Their concrete crumbling.  Their rebar protruding like broken bones.  Once upon a time, there was so much money to be made here.  Men built factories and businesses everywhere they turned.  Eventually, when business went bad, the factories and buildings were abandoned.  With no one to upkeep them, they became like weathered ghosts.  Deteriorated memorials harkening back to a better time. 

download.jpegConstruction is happening all across this city.  Slowly, the old is being torn down and replaced by new.  And in between the modern projects being carried out by cranes and the skeleton of what this city once was, brilliant murals scream to the passerby; but silently.  This is Philadelphia, the hub of the founding fathers.  The Declaration of Independence and the Constitution were both signed here.  As far as American cities go, there is lots of history here.  However, the city is not actually as haunted as people think it is.  The concerns of modern life (especially poverty) have distracted people from the past enough that the thought forms (ghosts) have dissipated.  People have been telling me that this is the second largest city on the East Coast.  Oddly, the city feels relatively empty.  It does not feel as frantic as cities usually do.  It feels like a small city in fact.  Philadelphia is what I expected Chicago to be before I actually went to Chicago.  A city of industrial sprawl. 

Anita and I.jpgI was hired to give a talk here for the Philadelphia I Can Do It Conference put on by Hay House (The picture to the right of fellow Hay House author Anita Moorjani and I was taken at the author party).  It was the first time that Hay House has put on one of these conferences here.  Whenever you bring a conference to a brand new city, it is a bit of a shot in the dark.  One can never know exactly what the response is going to be.  This time, the response was terrible.  The attendance at the event was so low that the conference center was like a ghost town during the days of the event.  Usually, a Hay House conference is so well attended it is like being in the New York subway; except surrounded by spiritual self-help addicts ;)  

The dominant negative vibration of Philadelphia is: Bewilderment.   A deep, painful perplexed confusion about life itself.  Let me explain what I mean.  Most places you go, people have created meaning for why bad things have happened to them.  For example, if a black man in New York doesn’t get a job, he may come to the conclusion that he didn’t get a job because of racial prejudice.  He then becomes convinced of it.  Or if a woman in Alabama may decide that she had a miscarriage because she wasn’t virtuous enough to carry one of God’s children so he took the baby away from her.  Meaning allows us to feel certain.  And even if the certainty is painful, it creates less stress than uncertainty does.  It creates cognitive closure.  It allows us to make sense of our world and to take action accordingly.

confused-c2e1e9d14491a9486d996da945debcc9d6ce7170-s900-c85.jpgThe people of Philadelphia lack the ability to assign meaning to the negative things they experience.  In other words, they don’t know WHY bad things happen to them in the way that they do.  Even when they tell you why they think bad things have happened to them, it is only skin deep, the conviction of knowing does not penetrate to their core.  Only uncertainty does.  They don’t know what they did to deserve elements of the life they are living.  They don’t know what to do in order to make things go their way so they can avoid these painful things in the future.  Being so uncertain about why bad things happen to them, they take it personally; but silently.  Deep down they wonder if they are being singled out by the universe.  If they are being singled out by the universe, they come to the conclusion that something must be bad/unlovable about them.  So the people of Philadelphia stay silent about their darkness as a result.  They really keep it only for themselves.  It can be felt like a shady undercurrent in most people here.  All of this creates a perplexed bewilderment among them and this perplexed bewilderment is heavy amongst the collective. 

People’s solar plexus chakras are very out of alignment here.  This dominant negative vibration of the people in this city causes a constriction around the pit of people’s stomachs.  It also causes visitors to start to feel confused.  And I have to say it… Irony struck when William Penn named this city Philadelphia, which is essentially an amalgamation of the Greek words for brother and love.  The city may have started on this foot, but the city could not live up to the name much past the early 1900s. The city of brotherly love is not a friendly city.  It is also not a safe city.               

shutterstock_87643360.jpgThe Dominant Positive Vibration of Philadelphia is: Manufacturing.  It’s hard to believe that after the economy took such a hit and after so many of the industries shut down here, that manufacturing would still be the dominant positive vibration here.  But it is and it has been for a really long time.  To manufacture is to make something and usually on a large scale.  Morse so than anything else, this vibration is a dominant residual thought form.  The modern people of Philly are still feeding into it, even though many of the actual things being produced here have changed.  When there is so much confusion (like there is with the dominant negative vibration of the city) and it is so hard to actually control things, there is something you can do to in order to avoid the anxiety and the depression… Distract yourself by pouring your efforts into making something.  That something could be art, food, product or even trained professionals (like taking in a student at university and creating a doctor or engineer).

rs-street-food-philadelphia-608.jpgPhiladelphia is famous for food.  People here LOVE their food with as much passion as many people love sports.  Unfortunately, all of the food they really love is unethical food or is food that I can’t eat due to my own sensitivities.  This is a bummer because when people are this passionate about their food, the food is unbeatable.  Believe it or not, the obsessive making and producing of food here is a byproduct of the ‘manufacturing’ vibration. 

tumblr_inline_nz43ws1dSO1tx8ppr_500.jpgYesterday, I ventured into the Reading Terminal Market.  I lasted a half an hour with the overstimulation of it all.  But it is an experience that I suggest all people have when they come to this city.  It is just so uniquely Philadelphia.  An enormous, no longer functioning train station that has been filled to the millimeter with venders.  If you are looking for any of Philadelphia’s specialties, you can find them there.  The unique merchants and displays along with the people milling through them, create a shock for the senses. 

big_350806_3074_DO110612006_UPD31.jpgToday, I am boarding a plane bound for Detroit, the city with the lowest vibration in the nation.  I have an interview in the airport and then I get to venture into the city.  I deliberately selected it for the site of my Completion Process Training because it has the lowest vibration in the nation.  I often get called out of body in response to emotional pain.  And more often than anywhere else in this country, I find myself in Detroit.  Trauma reigns triumphant there.  I am eager to genuinely survey the area because I have felt a work calling there for years now.  I am eager to see if my visit there makes this particular calling any more clear to me. 

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